Pass something down to your kids that will mean something.

by Kevin on September 30, 2010

I wish that I knew more about horse breeding and lineages than I do. Some people that I know can spout off all their horses’ dams and sires and the qualities associated with what those names mean. There are names that I recognize from my time working at the horse auction in Lubbock. I remember names like: Doc Bar, Mr. San Peppy, Doc Olena, Nanner Puddin’, Hancock, Leo, and Three Bars. Ok, so Nanner doesn’t belong in that group but he would be very upset if he knew I was talking about famous horses and didn’t include him.

All of these horses had traits that were desirable and people wanted to breed these horses so they could have a horse just like them—maybe even better. I am starting to appreciate bloodlines more as I get older. Although I still say that I will take an old mutt of a horse that works hard and has a heart like Rocky Balboa’s over a pretty horse that doesn’t.

There was a guy that had a real, real ugly horse for sale. A cowboy came and looked at the horse and said that he would be kind of embarrassed to be seen on such an ugly a horse. The guy told the cowboy to take the horse and work him as hard as he could. Actually, work him harder than any horse you have ever had. Try to see if you can make this horse work so hard that he quits.

A couple of days later, the cowboy shows up with cash to buy that old ugly horse. He told the man, “I ain’t never seen a tougher, better ranch horse in all my life. This has to be the toughest, hardest working horse I have ever been on. I worked him so hard it would have killed some of my other horses and he never balked.”

Papers may look good, but they don’t guarantee anything. The only time paper really means something in the pasture is when it’s white and comes on a roll.

Sometimes those good traits can be passed on from generation to generation. Sometimes there are some bad traits that get passed right along down the line with them. My dad had a mare named Spicy and I was told her bloodlines were good except that if she ever starting pitching, you couldn’t get her stop. That pretty much happened. She was a good horse, but she could sure buck.

If you were a horse, what would your bloodline say about you? Would you be a horse that quit when the going got tough? Would you be a Thoroughbred or a Quarter Horse? Would you be a horse with a good disposition most of the time but prone to fits if you don’t get your way? Would your pedigree indicate foundation stock or a “one hit wonder”? We always want our children to be athletes like we were. Bull riders like we were. Bronco twisters like we were. Cowboys like we were. We buy them bull ropes, saddles, clothes, boots, spurs, baseball helmets, cleats, and shin guards. We try prepare them for everything, except eternity.

Does your best quality that you pass down have anything to do with God? The Bible says you will reap what you sow. Alcoholics will raise alcoholics. Cowboys will raise cowboys. Athletes will raise athletes. Drug users will raise drug users. Dippers will raise dippers. Smokers will raise smokers. None of these are guaranteed, but more often than not, that is what happens. Instead of all of these, let’s try Christians raising Christians. Don’t be like the people that are mentioned in 2 Kings chapter 17:

14 But they would not listen and were as stiff-necked as their fathers, who did not trust in the LORD their God.

You either listen to God or you don’t. You either trust in God or you don’t. There is no middle ground here. I am reaching out right now to all the dads that read this. I don’t care if your children are 3 or 30 years old, be a good example to them. Listen to God and trust in Him. This is one of those things that you can’t fake. I can usually spot a fake cowboy a mile away and your children can spot a fake love of God even farther. Stiff-necked fathers raise stiff-necked children. Teach them how to bend that neck in prayer.

Go ahead, you can start right now.

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  • Greg Box

    AMEN COWBOY, AMEN!
    ALL GOD’S BLESSINGS TO YOU AND YOURS!

    Greg Box
    Midland, Texas

  • I wish I could say that Christians are always blessed with raising Christian children~but it just doesn’t happen that way. Faith is personal and each child makes their own personal decision on faith. It’s heartbreaking when you are a Christian parent and your children do not follow in your footsteps.

    Blessings,
    Janis

    • Kevin

      I understand what you are saying, but it’s not the immediate result that I am referring to. The Bible says, “Train up a child in the way he should go and when he is old, he will not depart from it.” –Proverbs 22:6

      It doesn’t say that he won’t depart from it when he is 20, 30, 40, or even 50. It says when he is old. Some people become old and wise before others.

  • Lori Adams

    I really likes this one! In my experience, though, I was SO worried about NOT becoming an alcoholic and falling into those footsteps that I turned to other means and addictions. I am so happy I am not bound down in that lifestyle anymore. I pray that the example I am setting now and my love for the Lord will guide my children.

    • Kevin

      You have come a long ways Lori!! I’ve never stopped praying for you and isn’t it wonderful that the Lord doesn’t give up on us.

  • Another great lesson. I never get tired of reading your posts.

    The older my children get the more I am concerned with how I am leading them towards Christ.

    • Kevin

      I try very hard to let my kids be kids, but still stress to them the importance of a relationship with God. Sometimes I do this well, sometimes I don’t. But it’s not a sprint, it’s a marathon.

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